Lifestyle

The Kansas City Southern Railroad track still runs past the vacant Mansura Depot that served train passengers and freight trains for many years, including welcoming a number of orphans to the state during the so-called Orphan Train program in the early 20th Century. The depot will have a new life as a community center and museum. {Photo by Raymond L. Daye}

Mansura Mayor Kenneth Pickett admires the workmanship on a new door installed at the Mansura Depot. {Photo by Raymond L. Daye}

This ticket window, facing the railroad track, once welcomed visitors to Mansura when passenger trains were a common means of travel. {Photo by Raymond L. Daye}

Some day the old Mansura Depot will welcome visitors with open arms and all the hospitality that Avoyelles Parish is known for. However, for now a white and red sign (on first window) tells would-be visitors to "Keep Out" while remodeling is being done to turn the 93-year-old structure into a home for a museum featuring the area’s history and the important role the railroad played here. {Photo by Raymond L. Daye}

Mansura Depot museum taking shape

It might take a bit of imagination to see a tourist attraction where an empty shell of a building now stands, but there are definitely indications of good things to come.

8-year-old Addison Gormsen and dad Wesley Gormsen of Marksville (at left) check out the rock painting table in the Kids Corner of the Marksville Farmers Market on a recent Saturday. The painting activity along with a bounce house was a popular attraction for kids while parents visited local produce and arts & crafts vendors. There are activities for kids each Saturday in June at the market. {Photo by Raymond L. Daye}

Marksville Farmers Market Week 2 had 'bayou' theme

There was a definite “bayou” theme to the Marksville Farmers Market on June 10. The event is held every Saturday in June, but each one has special attractions.

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AVOYELLES JOURNAL
BUNKIE RECORD
MARKSVILLE WEEKLY

105 N Main St
Marksville, LA 71351
(318) 253-9247